Muslim Boy Called 'Terrorist,' Booted From Bus After Reciting Arabic Prayer: Lawsuit | HuffPost Religion

synystrous:

ab-incunabulis:

awaitingmyescape:

IT WAS A TEN YEAR OLD BOY
DROPPED HIS CARD ON THE BUS AND SAID “BISLMILLAH” LOOKING FOR IT AND TNE DRIVER CALLED HIM A TERRORIST, KICKED HIM OFF THE BUS, AND LEFT THIS TEN YEAR OLD STRANDED
THE NY TRANSIT WONT EVEN RELEASE THE NAME OF THE DRIVER

Wow

(via capturethecastle)

21 Habits Of Supremely Happy People
'I Am Adam Lanza's Mother': A Mom's Perspective On The Mental Illness Conversation in America

In the wake of another horrific national tragedy, it’s easy to talk about guns. But it’s time to talk about mental illness.

Yes. This. Please read this. It’s not as simple as revising gun laws.

So too often an institution that is supposed to set its priorities based on the needs of a state or the needs of the planet instead alters its profile and curriculum to reflect the whims of the wealthy

jonathan-cunningham:

joshsternberg:

The University of Virginia fired its president for lack of ‘strategic dynamism’ and people are not happy. UVA professor  writes at Slate what this means for UVA and for education.

The biggest challenge facing higher education is market-based myopia. Wealthy board members, echoing the politicians who appointed them (after massive campaign donations) too often believe that universities should be run like businesses, despite the poor record of most actual businesses in human history.

Universities do not have “business models.” They have complementary missions of teaching, research, and public service. Yet such leaders think of universities as a collection of market transactions, instead of a dynamic (I said it) tapestry of creativity, experimentation, rigorous thought, preservation, recreation, vision, critical debate, contemplative spaces, powerful information sources, invention, and immeasurable human capital.

The structure of academia ought to be challenged, and often. As Prof. Vaidhyanathan says in the link, our educational institutions have a “market-based myopia” that prevents the fundamental pursuit of “teaching, research, and public service”.

(Source: joshsternberg)